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Maintain Your Slopes Early

Head of the Geotechnical Engineering Office (GEO) of the Civil Engineering Department, Mr Raymond Chan Kin-sek today (April 13) urged owners of private slopes to carry out proper maintenance works on their slopes without delay to reduce the risk of landslide during heavy rain.

Mr Chan warned that with the approach of the wet season, there is no room for complacency about landslide risk.

He noted that proper maintenance of slopes was one of the key factors to reduce landslide risk.

"Poorly maintained slopes or leaving slopes unattended may deteriorate to a point where they may become dangerous and fail during heavy rain. Regular maintenance costs much less than repairing a failed slope, and casualties can be avoided," he explained.

Mr Chan reminded that in preparation for the rainy season, owners of private slopes should have by now carried out inspection on the condition of their slopes and proceed with routine maintenance works accordingly. Such works include :

* clean and repair surface drains and catchpits;

* clear obstructions in weepholes;

* repair rigid and vegetated surface covers;

* seal open joints on rock slopes and remove loose rock debris;

* re-point deteriorated mortar joints on masonry face and repair spalling concrete wall surface.

A Layman's Guide to Slope Maintenance, produced by the GEO to promote slope safety, is available free-of-charge from the District Offices. The public can also obtain slope safety information on the Internet from the Hong Kong Slope Safety Website "http://hkss.cedd.gov.hk/"

GEO's Community Advisory Unit (CAU) also proactively contacts owners' corporations and mutual aid committees and holds regular meet-the-public sessions to advise the public on how to undertake slope maintenance works and other slope safety matters, such as how to proceed with the necessary slope upgrading works stipulated under the Dangerous Hillside Order. The public could call CAU staff (on Tel : 2760 5800) if they have questions on slope matters.

End / Saturday, April 13, 2002

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